Sixth County Provision Review


A review is due to take place on the future of post 16 education in Ceredigion.

At its meeting on Tuesday January 11, the Ceredigion County Council Cabinet was asked to authorize officers to ‘compile a brief and conduct a post 16 education review’ to be brought back to senior councillors.

Cllr Keith Evans highlighted the need for the details to be forwarded to the Control Committee as well, which was agreed by all members.

A report presented at the meeting said a recent report on school services measures had identified 51 of the 199 A-level courses available in sixth form and middle schools had fewer than five students.

Senior advisers have been told that it is expected that by January 2024 there will be around 776 students in Years 12 and 13, an increase from 701 in 2020, and that “five of Ceredigion’s six sixth grades will have probably less than 150 students. ”

This is the level that the Audit Commission has suggested makes a sixth form viable.

Ceredigion County Council last reviewed its education for the over-16s in 2007-08, and the current arrangements must also take into account the ‘driving of the nationwide post-16 transition programme’ .

Cllr Catrin Miles, Cabinet Member responsible for Schools, Lifelong Learning and Skills, Support and Response, said: “It is time for a post supply review. -16 to gather facts and views on what works and what can be developed.

Officers will depart and undertake a review of the disposition of the sixth form in the county, with their findings to be discussed at a later date.

Ceredigion County Council has also agreed to work closely with neighboring Powys on schooling.

A number of local authorities in Wales have left ERW and Ceredigion’s plan is to work with Powys County Council as a Mid Wales Education and Methods Partnership agreed working conditions have been established.

It is already working on a number of other local authority partnerships linked to the Mid Wales Growth Deal and economic regeneration, as well as new Joint Works Councils (JWCs) to be established to oversee strategic planning, transport and economic well-being.

The aim is ‘to ensure fairness of supply for schools in Powys and Ceredigion’, according to a report presented to councillors.

“While education is not a policy area that should be governed by a CJC, Ceredigion shares many similarities and challenges with Powys, particularly those related to rurality. It is therefore only natural that Ceredigion and Powys continue to work closely together on the education agenda,” the report adds.

The collaboration currently focuses on leadership development, deprivation and rural poverty, the curriculum for Wales, improving pedagogy and other areas related to early teaching careers.

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